Lansing's Dental Discussion

Posts for: April, 2022

By Holly Scott-Hetchler DDS
April 21, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implant  
WhatsInvolvedinGettingaDentalImplant

Although the term "surgery" is broad enough to drive a proverbial truck through, we can roughly categorize procedures as either major or minor. Installing an implant is decidedly in the minor column.

Akin to having a tooth extraction, implant surgery can be done painlessly in a dentist's office with very little discomfort afterward. If you're considering a dental implant, going through this surgical procedure shouldn't worry you.

Still, it's hard not to feel a little nervous about any type of surgery, even one as minor as getting an implant. That's where shining a little more light in the way of information can help dissolve any lingering anxiety. Here, then, is an overview of dental implant surgery from start to finish.

First, a little planning. Preparation beforehand helps eliminate any potential snags during surgery. During earlier visits, your dentist will completely map out the procedure with x-rays or CT scanning of your jaws to locate any obstacles, followed by the preparation of a surgical guide placed in the mouth to direct drilling.

Numbing the pain. The dentist begins the surgery by completely deadening the area with local anesthesia. This is usually done with an anesthetic swab of the surface gums to numb the needle prick, which is then used to deliver the remaining anesthetic to the deeper tissues and bone.

Creating the channel. After ensuring the area is fully anesthetized, the dentist will expose the bone by making small incisions in the gums. Then, using the surgical guide, they'll drill a small hole, incrementally enlarging it until it matches the size of the implant post.

Installing the implant. After drilling, the dentist removes the implant from its sterile packaging and directly places it into the prepared channel. The dentist then ensures the implant positioning is correct, often checking with additional x-rays. They'll then suture the gums back into place to protect the implant.

You may initially have a few days of mild discomfort, usually manageable with over-the-counter pain relievers. Over the next few weeks new bone cells will form and adhere to the implant to create a durable bond. You'll then be ready for the attachment of a life-like crown.

Surgery is one step in a long process. But it's an important step—and with the resulting smile outcome, well worth it.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”


ThisTemporaryRPDCouldSustainYourSmileWhileYouWaitForImplants

Dental implants are often the ideal choice to replace missing teeth. Unfortunately, "ideal" and "affordable" don't always align simultaneously for people. Even if implants are right for you, you may have to put them off to a more financially appropriate season.

In the meantime, though, you're still missing teeth—and perhaps some of them are right square in the middle of your smile. What can you do now, even if temporarily?

The solution might be a flexible removable partial denture (RPD). These newer types of RPD fit somewhere between the lightweight "flipper" and the more traditional rigid plastic appliances often made for permanent use. The flexible RPD is made of nylon plastic (technically known as a super-polyamide), which although lightweight, is highly durable.

Super-polyamides change their shape under high heat, a characteristic dental technicians take advantage of by injection molding heated material into flexible denture bases, to which they then attach the replacement teeth. Like other RPDs, a flexible RPD is custom-designed for the individual patient to match their jaw contours, as well as the types and locations of their missing teeth.

Flexible RPDs also differ from other RPD types in how they stay in place. While the more rigid RPD depends on metal clasps that grip to some of the remaining natural teeth, a flexible RPD uses finger-like extensions of the nylon material to fit around teeth near the gum line where they're difficult to see. As such, the flexible RPD is both comfortable and securely held in place.

A flexible RPD, like their counterparts, does require regular maintenance. Any RPD can accumulate dental plaque, a thin biofilm buildup on teeth that causes dental disease. For this reason, wearers should regularly remove their RPD and clean it thoroughly with an antibacterial soap (never toothpaste). All RPDs should also be removed at night to limit bacterial growth.

With a little care, a flexible RPD could last for several years. It could be just the solution to buy you time while you're waiting to obtain dental implants.

If you would like more information on restoration options for missing teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Flexible Partial Dentures.”


By Holly Scott-Hetchler DDS
April 01, 2022
Category: Oral Health
EmmaRobertsConfessestoHavingaMajorSweetToothWhileExpecting

Emma Roberts, star of American Horror Story (and niece of actress Julia Roberts), welcomed her first child at the end of 2020. She confessed that her love of sweets made pregnancy challenging. She couldn't get enough of cupcakes with sprinkles and a Salt & Straw ice cream flavor called The Great Candycopia. But Roberts isn't unique. Hormonal changes in pregnancy often bring heightened cravings for certain foods. Unfortunately, this can increase an expectant mother's risk for dental disease, especially if they're consuming more sugary foods.

In fact, around four in ten expectant women will develop a form of periodontal disease called pregnancy gingivitis. It begins with dental plaque, a thin film that forms on tooth surfaces filled with oral bacteria that can infect the gums. And what do these bacteria love to eat? Yep—sugar, the same thing many women crave during pregnancy.

So, if you're expecting a baby, what can you do to minimize your risk for dental disease?

Practice oral hygiene. Removing dental plaque by brushing and flossing daily is the most important thing you can do personally to prevent both tooth decay and gum disease. It's even more important given the physical and hormonal changes that occur when you're pregnant. Be sure, then, that you're diligent about brushing and flossing every day without fail.

Control your sugar intake. If you have strong cravings for sweets, cutting back may be about as easy as stopping an elephant on a rampage through the jungle. But do give your best effort to eating more dairy- and protein-rich foods rather than refined carbohydrates like pastries or candies. Not only will reducing sugar help you avoid dental disease, these other foods will help strengthen your teeth.

Maintain regular dental visits. Seeing us for regular cleanings further reduces your disease risk. We can clean your teeth of any plaque deposits you might have missed, especially hardened plaque called tartar that's nearly impossible to remove with brushing and flossing. We'll also monitor your teeth and gums for any developing disease that requires further treatment.

Undergo needed treatments. Concerned for their baby's safety, many expectant mothers are hesitant about undergoing dental procedures. But both the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Dental Association endorse necessary dental treatments during pregnancy, even if they include local anesthesia. We will make you have only a safe type of anesthesia, and we can advise you when it is prudent to postpone certain treatments, such as some elective procedures, until after the baby is born.

Emma Roberts got through a healthy pregnancy—cravings and all—and is now enjoying her new baby boy. Whether you're a celebrity like Emma Roberts or not, expecting a baby is an exciting life moment. Follow these tips to keep your teeth and gums healthy throughout your pregnancy, and be sure to let the dental team know of your pregnancy before any treatment.

If you would like more information about dental care during pregnancy, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Pregnancy and Oral Health.”




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