Lansing's Dental Discussion

Posts for: December, 2015

By Holly A. Scott-Hetchler DDS, PC
December 27, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dentures  

Whether the person sitting in the dentist's chair is a 20 year old college student, or an 82 year old great grandfather, cosmetic dentistry has made it possible for anyone to have a perfect smile, regardless of past dental problems. Yet even with abundant access to oral healthcare, many people let fear of the dentist, embarrassment, and myths about common dental practices and procedures get in the Denturesway of fixing their smile and replacing missing teeth.

The Truth About Dentures

One of the biggest myths about dentistry is that tooth loss - and by extension dentures - are problems that exclusively affect the elderly. Periodontal disease, the leading cause of tooth loss, can (and often does) also affect younger adults. Poor oral hygiene habits, as well as genetics, can lead to gum disease and tooth loss well before retirement age. Trauma and accidents also cause tooth loss at any age.

In addition to the cosmetic considerations (missing teeth can not only cause embarrassment and self esteem problems, they can also cause the skin around the mouth to sag and become hollow), they can also lead to loss of healthy bone tissue in the jaw.

Benefits of Cosmetic Dentures

Dentures have come a long way since the time of America's first president and most famous founding father and dental patient, George Washington (yes he did have them, and no they were not made out of wood). There are several types of dentures, all of which are designed for a secure fit, and to match the cosmetic appearance of natural teeth.

Depending on the extent of tooth loss and the individual needs of each patient, Lansing dentist Dr. Holly A. Scott-Hetchler will recommend:

  • Complete dentures
  • Partial dentures
  • Overdentures
  • Implant-supported denture
  • Immediate dentures
  • Soft liners

Many people state shame or embarrassment over missing teeth and other dental problems as a major factor in their overall self image and confidence, which can negatively impact everything from career success to social and personal relationships. Cosmetic dentures can help to improve a person's overall quality of life by restoring their natural smile.

To learn more about dentures and comprehensive dental care in Lansing, contact Holly A. Scott-Hetchler DDS, PC at (517) 487-6333 to schedule a consultation today!


By Holly Scott-Hetchler DDS
December 27, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: partial denture   bridge  
ATeensMissingToothMayRequireaTemporaryReplacement

Besides reduced biting and chewing function, a missing tooth can cause an embarrassing inhibition to healthy social interaction. This can be especially so for teens who greatly value peer relationships and acceptance.

Be that as it may, we typically discourage a permanent replacement for teens with a missing tooth, particularly dental implants. While we value a patient’s psychological needs, the long-term effect on dental health may be too great to advise otherwise.

The effect we’re concerned with involves jaw growth and development. Although a person’s permanent teeth have usually all erupted by early adolescence, the jaws continue to grow until the late teens or early twenties. Natural teeth can adapt to this growth because the periodontal ligament that holds them in place allows for incremental tooth movement. The teeth move in response to jaw growth and are thus able to maintain their proper relationship and alignment in the jaw as growth occurs.

Dental implants, on the other hand, are imbedded into the jaw bone: they, therefore, can’t move like natural teeth and thus can’t adjust their position with jaw growth, particularly the upper jaw as it grows forward and down. This can result in the implants appearing as though they are left behind or retreat into the jaw. It can also affect the position of the gums and inhibit their growth around the implants.

It’s best then to hold off implants and other permanent restorations until the jaw has finished developing. That, however, isn’t always easy to determine: specialized x-ray diagnostics may help, but it’s not an exact science. Your input as a parent will also be helpful, such as whether you’ve noticed the end of growth spurts (not changing clothes or shoe sizes as often) or your child’s recent similarity in appearance to other adult members of your family. It thus becomes a judgment call, based on examination and experience, as to whether it’s safe to proceed with implants — and may require erring on the side of caution.

In the meantime, there are temporary restorations that can improve appearance while you wait for the appropriate time to undertake a permanent restoration. Two of the most useful are removable partial dentures (RPDs) or a bonded bridge, a less invasive form of the traditional bridge. With a proper assessment we can advise you on which option is your best choice.

If you would like more information on tooth restorations for teenagers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teenagers & Dental Implants.”


AmericasDentistsGotTalent-forFixingDamagedorMissingTeeth

A recent episode of “America’s Got Talent” featured an engaging 93-year-old strongman called The Mighty Atom Jr. The mature muscleman’s stunt: moving a full-sized car (laden with his octogenarian “kid brother,” his brother’s wife, plus Atom’s “lady friend”) using just his teeth. Grinning for host Howie Mandel, Atom proudly told the TV audience that his teeth were all his own; then he grasped a leather strap in his mouth, and successfully pulled the car from a standstill.

We’re pleased to see that the Atom has kept his natural teeth in good shape: He must have found time for brushing and flossing in between stunts. Needless to say, his “talent” isn’t one we’d recommend trying at home. But aside from pulling vehicles, teeth can also be chipped or fractured by more mundane (yet still risky) activities — playing sports, nibbling on pencils, or biting too hard on ice. What can you do if that happens to your teeth?

Fortunately, we have a number of ways to repair cracked or chipped teeth. One of the easiest and fastest is cosmetic bonding with tooth-colored resins. Bonding can be used to fill in small chips, cracks and discolorations in the teeth. The bonding material is a high-tech mixture of plastic and glass components that’s extremely lifelike, and can last for several years. Plus, it’s a procedure that can be done right in the office, with minimal preparation or discomfort. However, it may not be suitable for larger chips, and it isn’t the longest-lasting type of restoration.

When more of the tooth structure is missing, a crown (or cap) might be needed to restore the tooth’s appearance and function. This involves creating a replacement for the entire visible part of the tooth in a dental lab — or in some cases, right in the office. It typically involves making a model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors, then fabricating a replica, which will fit perfectly into the bite. Finally, the replacement crown is permanently cemented to the damaged tooth. A crown replacement can last for many years if the tooth’s roots are in good shape. But what if the roots have been dislodged?

In some cases it’s possible to re-implant a tooth that has been knocked out — especially if it has been carefully preserved, and receives immediate professional attention. But if a tooth can’t be saved (due to a deeply fractured root, for example) a dental implant offers today’s best option for tooth replacement. This procedure has a success rate of over 95 percent, and gives you a natural looking replacement tooth that can last for the rest of your life.

So what have we learned? If you take care of your teeth, like strongman Atom, they can last a long time — but if you need to move your car, go get the keys.

If you would like more information about tooth restoration, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”




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